Tagged: bird

Learning to fly in Life

Observe a flying bird. There is a time for flapping the wings and a time to glide.
There is a variation known as bounding flight.

For a bird those movements are natural, flapping and gliding are together. A circumstance will drive the timing for change, but in general; gliding takes way longer than flapping.

Humans believe that fighting to get what “I want” is a necessary never ending flight. That sort of flapping is tiresome, it is debilitating. Humans do not know how to glide for they fear to give up control.
How could I go faster if I am gliding?
How could I achieve if I take it easy?
When the wind blows against his flying direction, a human will strongly “fight” and swear to “never give up.” That sort of heroic immolation, is only a childish silly situation.

Flapping and gliding in Life go hand in hand. Going with the wind of Life rather than against it, is the art of unity, vitality and preservation.

The mind will ask: How do I know when it is the right moment to glide?
The answer is obvious. Ask the bird.
No answer? Then watch. Observe. Empty your beliefs and conditionings. Shut down the questions.
What is worthwhile in Life to learn, cannot be learned through the mind.

The mind knows about “success.” It knows about “failure.”
Life is without that duality for to glide, is not the opposite of flapping. Those are one. Timing for flapping or gliding is not something to learn, but to feel.

Feeling is something that most humans have not been trained to “do.” Thus, they need to ask questions, to make sure, to “get it right,” “to get ahead,” to be “successful,” “to be saved.”

The ideals become more important than feeling. But without feeling, there is no living.

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Lessons from the animal kingdom

Long-billed Curlew Numenius americanus eating a sand crab at sun

In my walk around the Bay, a medium-sized bird jumped in the grassy area in front of me. The bird had a long beak and a small body. Don’t know the name of that bird (I didn’t ask the bird 🙂 ) After looking carefully at the bird, I saw that a small crab was in its beak.

The bird was trying to digest the crab and the crab was trying to run away.

The bird would drop the crab and peck the crab to break it apart so it could be eaten.

Despite the scene, it was an interesting time to observe myself. Thoughts were coming about “saving the crab” from the “evil” bird…but then, another thought came up about the bird needing to eat something to survive.

Animals do not kill for the “fun of it,” or because they need to make “more money,” that is human beings. Animals kill when they need to eat.
The word “kill” for some animals is the equivalent of “eating dinner” by a human being.

Then, my mind was divided. The more knowledge or information I have about things, then to “understand” the ways of Nature could be very challenging.

I dropped my thoughts altogether and merely observed without emitting judgment, without emitting human morality to understand things, just looking at the scene.

It was part of the experience of liberating myself from my own mind and from all what I had learned in the past.

Then, I wondered where those moral ideals came from? I remembered curious Billy in the Disney channel, saving his “cute” lab rat from being eaten by the “evil” snake dwelling in a crystal box inside the cold science classroom. I bet the snake doesn’t want to be there….

That snake eats lab rats to survive… but not curious Billy’s rodent! That Billy is a hero! 🙂

Forget about other rats…but Billy’s is out of the question. We don’t want to see Billy with a sad face. That wouldn’t be a “happy end” for a Disney program!

Interesting maneuver to manipulate moral standards…. But for the masses, we should save “cute” animals from evil predators, especially if they are “ours.”

I guess I did not feel that the little crab was “mine,” for otherwise the “morality” of “mine” could have attempted to save that crab…

It comes down to our sense of belonging, of possessing. That creates our morality. Take a look at any commandment; any rule. There is this sense of possession, which becomes important to “protect.”

It is my religion, my country, my family, my…that is what is important. Those things are “mine.” I have some interest over them, I posses them.

Morality is an attempt to protect what is “mine” from what is “yours.”

The interesting thing is that all of those teachings, which we have learned, only exist at the mental level. Those are human inventions, which do not fit the way “real life” works, that is Nature. Similarly, religious beliefs or any belief are only living at the mental level.

In Nature, there is balance. Predators are in balance with other species. It is only when a thinking human being enters into this balancing act; when things get out of balance. A paradox! 🙂
Then one species could disappear. Then another species could become human “pets” for they need “protection.” Then, chaos arises out of the need to “have,” to “possess,” to “accomplish.”

Then human moralists, thinkers, philosophers, scientists, etc. will create a definition, a concept for “everyone” to accept. That lost balance cannot be returned by more thinking.

Isn’t it funny how animals who don’t think live in balance with Nature whereas thinking human beings struggle to do that?

“I think, therefore I exist.”
“I think” that that phrase needs to be revised…