On tolerance and patience

acceptance

Ananda was complaining to Mathias, the wise tree; about the visit of a friend; Raysha.

Ananda likes to relax, unwind and take it easy. Raysha on the other hand, likes to be with people all the time, by using her effective “healing skills” she was helping many and having many people around her; but Ananda was not used to such movement.

Ananda told Mathias in a lamenting tone of voice with suffering gestures:
“ I couldn’t sleep well last night…What can I do, friend. I have to tolerate and have patience during her visit.”
Mathias responded to Ananda’s sacrifice and toleration: “ Friend, Mathias is amused at your performance…” 🙂

Ananda thought that he was going to get some sympathy from his friend; after all he was practicing the “virtue” of tolerance and being extremely patient with Raysha.

In the consciousness of “you” and “I,” that is when the child is separated from the Father as well as the other “brothers and sisters,” the word tolerance is “good.” It is called a virtue.

A child can “tolerate” another brother or a sister when things are not going according to his wishes.

A child can have patience with “another” when the response he is getting does not fit his expectations.

A child, who can only see separation, will be tolerating things as a “good thing to do.” It is a “virtue” to tolerate others.

However, in another consciousness, to tolerate means not to accept things as they are. In other words, “I” pretend to go along with whatever is happening to avoid confrontation or a childish tantrum in front of others.

Any sort of “toleration” has a breaking point. Things cannot longer be tolerated and then, the “real” self comes out from the repression of having to tolerate.

Is truly to tolerate a virtue?
When the “savage” child pretends to be “well behaved “ for the sake of all, to tolerate may be called a virtue by some. Nevertheless, it is not a virtue, when that performance is born out of separation and it does not reflect the true feelings of the self.

In oneness, there is only continuity in life changes. If we could observe ourselves and see how we “pretend” to be “nice” with “others” through being “tolerant;” we can see that our vibes and feelings change. Using a nice word such as “toleration” cannot mask those vibes.

In oneness there is emptiness of that “I” which puts a wall on things that are happening. That wall is the product of our own beliefs and comfort zones; that is the construction of a personality. When that personality clashes with “others” or with a circumstance, then we could either “react” or be “tolerant.”

To react is to hit something from the inside to the outside. To tolerate is to hit the self, the inside from the inside…

There is no virtue in self-damage, but in the childish world where there is only “you or me,” as separated beings, a virtue is meant to help others over the self. You need to select between you or someone else.

In Oneness, there is no “other.” Therefore, no need to tolerate or be patient. This is not a concept to be analyzed, it is an experience of life through a different vision.

Virtues cannot appear by being cultivated. We are already complete with all of them; but the illusory vision of separation may need to change, the “illusion” needs to be removed for those virtues to automatically appear.

The support of the “I” through spiritual teachings separating the “you and me,” is a beginner step into the recognition of that “I” but is not meant to be the whole “truth” but just a different view according to consciousness.

As we change our view, our consciousness from that separation into oneness, there is a different perception where patience and toleration are no longer needed.

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2 comments

  1. nidhi

    Virtues cannot appear by being cultivated. We are already complete with all of them; but the illusory vision of separation may need to change, the “illusion” needs to be removed for those virtues to automatically appear.

    no words to explain i found newness in those lines…new perception…thank u so much 🙂

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